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The benefits and drawbacks of working from home

The benefits and drawbacks of working from home

Let’s face it, working is still working, regardless of where you do it. So, should you go to the workplace or work from home? In all honesty, it boils down to your working environment and the sector you work in. How lovely your home office is, too.

Having said that, let’s look at some of the traditional advantages of telecommuting!

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The benefits of working from home

  1. Adaptable timetable You can take breaks whenever you like, don’t feel rushed to end phone calls from family members, and have lunch whenever it suits you.
  2. Individual environment Select your preferred level of volume, which can range from being completely silent to being in the front row at a Lady Gaga performance. Also, you can improve the rhythm of your processes if you pay attention to the ergonomics of your desk.
  3. Cozy attire You get to put on those letter-peeling sweatpants from college or the leggings your buddies have no idea you own. Hopefully, it never will.
  4. Calls are simpler to make You won’t have to deal with a particularly chatty coworker or race to find a meeting room. (But some remote workers may find this challenging due to children and pets at home.)
  5. Do some weekend tasks You know that mountain of laundry waiting for you? 11 weeks ago, you set a reminder for that item from the store. Write it off.
  6. No obtrusive office noise As you hide your icicle tears, stay away from coworkers discussing the benefits of cryptocurrencies, sirens blaring outside your window, and the AC turning on.
  7. There is none To a bed, then a bed? Hey, I don’t mind; it’s good.
  8. Spend less If you work in a metropolis or downtown, lunch is expensive. A $15 meal or a $4 cappuccino is not out of the ordinary in San Francisco. By going to the grocery and preparing food at home, you can save a ton of money.
  9. Delete the traffic and crowds No cramming yourself into a flimsy tube of transit, having people scratch your new shoes, or being forced to walk behind agonizingly slow people who seem to have no concept of a straight line. (Am I resentful? No, I’m not angry.
  10. More time to spend with loved ones Care for a sick loved one at home, get the kids ready early, spend more time cuddling with the dog, or just find some peace and quiet for yourself!

Problems with Working from Home

  1. Willpower You still have four episodes of Tiger King to see, but you need to get started on this new endeavor, according to Netflix.
  2. Trouble following a regimen Hardly never do you complete tasks in the same order at home as you do at work. It can be challenging to replicate your routine and working methods while you are not at work.
  3. Missing crucial pings or calls My phone was set to “do not disturb,” which caused me to miss a meeting. It’s 4:45 p.m., or perhaps my supervisor advised me to prioritize something else.
  4. I’ll call UberEats anyhow Did you really believe you were saving money? Blam-o! For the higher rated Thai restaurant, there is a $20 minimum and a $5 fee. I should have recalled to get bread.
  5. Energy naps This might undoubtedly have benefits. Unless your two entree Thai meal is unintentionally brought after 45 minutes.
  6. Boredom The office discussions? Missing Susan’s cat stories a little, huh? How much time can pass before you see another living person?
  7. Advancing slowly Sometimes there is a buzz in the office. Your house doesn’t always.
  8. No additional monitor How could I ever function without two enormous screens towering over me? My 74 tabs are all necessary!
  9. Crappy WiFi When the wifi goes out at home or in a coffee shop, you may swap locations a few times, but in reality, you spend more time parking and buying a 6-shot mint mojito coffee with coconut milk and 16 grains of sugar than working.
  10. Awaiting a response You need to ask a simple inquiry, but the answer will affect how you go for the remainder of the day or even the next hour. There is also no reply. Playing “The Waiting”

“FOMO at Home.” “FOMO at Work.”

The other side of the fence is almost always greener.

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Nothing sounds more wonderful than a cozy day indoors with your favorite blanket when you’re at work. At home, you remember cracking jokes with your coworkers and ponder whether the coffee maker produced quality coffee that day.

In either case, it’s crucial to pick the setting where you’ll succeed the most. As everyone has different experiences with remote work, it is impossible to generalize about what works and what doesn’t. The distraction problem for one person might be the productivity booster for another. Learning to focus in any environment is a critical life skill that can only benefit your professional career in the long term, especially as remote-first organizations grow popularity as you start working longer hours and getting more experience. If you’re still somewhat new to working remotely, start by simply determining where and why you work best.

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Be Loyal To Thine Own Self

What setting helps you focus the longest, how long it takes you to get back on track, and your preferred communication style are some crucial factors to take into account. Working from home is the best option for you if you have strong self-motivation, can stick to a schedule, and like few interruptions.

Working from the office is the greatest option if you enjoy social connections, are motivated by observing others at work, and remain on task more easily when others can see you.

On occasion, a project calls for more solitude, increased teamwork, and resource preparation. It’s crucial to be flexible so you can work where you think you’ll be most effective.

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